Look out for Ultrahaptics haptic feedback in new cars this year

Look out for Ultrahaptics haptic feedback in new cars this year

Haptic controls: No amount of photos can make them look good. Try it out, though: it’s a little bit like magic. If you look closely, you can see the Leap Motion that’s being used for the hand tracking. The haptic feedback comes from the ultrasonic array immediately below the Leap Motion. Since Ultrahaptics was founded in 2013, the company has showed off a string of better and better technical demos. Which has been fun, but obviously where the rubber really hits the road (pun most emphatically intended) is when the products start showing up in the real world. 2017 may just prove to be the year where that happens. Underneath all the car-porn, Bosch’s products usually give a heads-up of what’s to come in the near future Cars, perhaps more than in any other market, is where haptic feedback interfaces make the most sense. Car makers love the flexibility of touch screens; it means that you don’t have to figure out what every button does and where it goes in the long production cycles of automobiles. You carve out a big slab of space to fit a screen, and the software guys do the rest. Makes sense; this is the exact same approach that means you can use your smartphone for a billion different things, rather than just sending SMS messages, making phone calls and playing snake . There’s a problem with touch screens, though. A big one. You can’t operate them without looking at the screen . Which is a really, really bad idea when you’re barreling down the road at 70 miles per hour 3,000 lbs worth of steel and glass. Which brings us back to haptic interfaces. An interface that gives you all the feels. A few weeks ago, BMW showed off the HoloActive haptic interface […]