How a White Hat Hacker Breaks Into a Business

How a White Hat Hacker Breaks Into a Business

A pen tester talks through how to break into a company. The phone rings and the IT department answers. On the other end is the secretary for the president of a big bank, one of your company’s biggest customers. The bank’s president is doing a video presentation with your president and the secretary has no idea what she’s doing. She’s freaking out. She’s got a list of crazy questions her tech people told her to ask about things like “firewalls” she doesn’t understand. The technician on the other end does what you’d want any good employee to do: He calms her down and starts walking through her questions. He even offers to login to to a company’s server and share his screen so she knows exactly what to tell her tech people. Phew, what a lifesaver. But it wasn’t a secretary, it was a hacker. And a well-meaning technician has just given away the keys to his company’s cybervault. That’s just one way that a hacker might get information like what firewall and antivirus software your company is running. Thankfully, this particular hack wasn’t perpetrated by a cybercriminal, it was done by a professional security expert called a “pen tester.” Listening to Clint Crigger talk, it’s hard to imagine any of us have a real shot when it comes to cybersecurity. Crigger is a pen tester, and while that doesn’t sound like an impressive title (it’s short for penetration tester, which sound more impressive; and is also known as red teaming, which is even better), it means he spends his days breaking into businesses and financial institutions. Thankfully for you, Crigger hacks into systems because he’s been asked to, to test the security that all of us take for granted when we log in to our bank website or […]