Good luck silencing science

Good luck silencing science

Good luck silencing science Technology and the internet have empowered science just as they have business and communication. As with the others, tech has helped make scientific endeavors global in scope, robust against interference, and accessible by billions — with or without the consent of the powers that be. That’s just one reason why the current administration’s efforts to muzzle scientific inquiry will fail. The list of federal agencies having their online communications tampered with or outright shut down is growing: the EPA, the National Parks Service, the Departments of Energy, Agriculture, Transportation, and the Interior, among others. Because of the ham-handed way it was done, it’s obvious these agencies are being reined in specifically with regard to climate change. Good luck with that! First though, let’s dispel the possibility that we’re all jumping the gun here. This is a time of transition between administrations, after all. Why wouldn’t there be a few hiccups as things get rewired? Even major lapses like losing the entire Spanish version of the White House website could be bumps in the road. But it isn’t a casual absence of, say, the words “solar,” “wind,” or “renewable” from the administration’s energy plan . Nor is it accidental that there is no replacement for, or even a rebuttal of Obama’s climate change policy. Nor that the National Parks Service was chastised after several tweets regarding climate change. Nor that the CDC suddenly cancelled its conference on climate change. Nor that cabinet nominees repeatedly refused to acknowledge the existence or urgency of climate change. Nor that many other agencies receiving communications restrictions of varying intensity have jurisdiction over things largely affecting or affected by climate change. Nor that the EPA has been gagged, hobbled, told to remove its page on climate change, and now to have […]